The Strange History of Dermal Fillers

1890s

1890s

It wasn’t long after the invention of the syringe that medical professionals began experimenting with the idea of facial fillers. The first injectable filling agent used was paraffin wax. Paraffin proved to be a less than effective option as migration, embolization (wax particles entering the bloodstream), and granulomas (small masses of tissue under the skin) were common after treatment.

1900s

1900s

In the mid-1900s, silicone injections were used to help achieve a smoother, more youthful appearance. However, this too was short-lived as the type of silicone used still caused granulomas.

1970s-1980s

1970s-1980s

It wasn’t until the 1970s that animal collagen was introduced and tested. Bovine collagen was the first agent to be approved by the FDA for cosmetic injection in 1981. Bovine collagen showed much promise, but there were still a few drawbacks. Allergic reactions and swelling occurred for some people when using bovine collagen, and results were not long-lasting.

2000s

2000s

Hyaluronic acid, a natural substance that is already found in our bodies, was FDA approved in the 2000s and has been a mainstay for dermal fillers ever since. Dermal fillers with hyaluronic acid (HA) last much longer than bovine collagen and this substance is less reactive in the body.

Present Day

Present Day

Today, HA dermal fillers like Restalyne®, JUVÉDERM®, and Sculptra® are used for a variety of cosmetic purposes. With dermal fillers you can:

  • Fill in deep lines and wrinkles around the nose, mouth and chin
  • Restore and enhance volume in the lips and cheeks
  • Reduce acne scars

Although fillers offer temporary results, they can now last anywhere from 6 months to 2 years depending on the formulation and are easily maintained.

Summary
The Strange History of Dermal Fillers
Article Name
The Strange History of Dermal Fillers
Author
Publisher Name
Dr. Eric Mariotti
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